Barron's Fund Family Rankings

Franklin Templeton Ranked #1 by Barron’s for its funds’ total return performance, #1 out of 45, for the 10-Year period ended 2011

Each year, Barron's publishes an annual ranking of mutual fund families.1 Since 2002, Franklin Templeton has been ranked in the top 3 for 8 out of the 10 years, and in the top 10 every year, based on 10-year total return performance.

Topping it off, Franklin Templeton was ranked #1 for the 10-year periods ending in 2008, 2009 and 2011 - reflecting the firm's strength during very challenging times in financial markets around the globe.

Franklin Templeton’s Ranking for the 10-year Period

For the 1-, 5- and 10-year periods ended December 31, Franklin Templeton ranked as follows, respectively: 2011: 30 out of 58, 9 out of 53 and 1 out of 45; 2010: 37 out of 57, 8 out of 53 and 2 out of 46; 2009: 17 out of 61, 5 out of 54 and 1 out of 48; 2008: 26 out of 59, 16 out of 53 and 1 out of 48; 2007: 35 out of 67, 19 out of 61 and 7 out of 52; 2006: 5 out of 67, 2 out of 62 and 6 out of 50; 2005: 36 out of 65, 4 out of 59 and 2 out of 40; 2004: 7 out of 73, 3 out of 67 and 2 out of 49; 2003: 29 out of 75, 3 out of 70 and 3 out of 40; 2002: 6 out of 81, 7 out of 72 and 2 out of 24.

Past performance does not guarantee future results.

Footnotes:
  1. Barron's 02/05/2012. To qualify for the Barron's/Lipper Fund Survey, a group must have at least three funds in Lipper's general U.S.-stock category; one in world equity, which combines global and international funds; one mixed-equity fund, which holds stocks and bonds; two taxable-bond funds and one tax-exempt fund. Fund loads and 12b-1 fees aren't included in the calculation of returns because the aim is to measure the manager's skill. Each fund's return is measured against all funds in its Lipper category, resulting in a percentile ranking which was then weighted by asset size relative to the fund family's other assets in its general classifications. Finally, the score is multiplied by the general classification weighting as determined by the entire Lipper universe of funds.